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Author Topic: [SOLVED] advanced bash scripting guide  (Read 367 times)

Offline poohduck

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[SOLVED] advanced bash scripting guide
« on: November 28, 2017, 03:41:42 am »
this isn't a question, just something I've found that other newbies might find useful. I ran the synaptic package manager and installed the recommended updates (after removing a few unnecessary ones). One of the packages selected for installing or updating was abs guide - the advanced bash scripting guide. I assumed this would install somewhere logical like documents, but no. Anyway, I won't tell you where it installs to because the book is made up of all sorts of elements, including html files. What you need is to create a symbolic link from index.html to your documents folder, and all will work (well that's what I've done). The index.html is in usr/share/doc/abs-guide/html.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2018, 02:15:14 am by poohduck »

Offline penguin

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Re: advanced bash scripting guide
« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2017, 01:42:16 pm »
how to search in linux systems.

After some install..

in terminal

sudo updatedb

use locate command in terminal
locate *what_you_want_to_find*

or command find

Code: [Select]
https://www.lifewire.com/uses-of-linux-command-find-2201100
or...
install
fsearch or angrysearch
(similar to everything utility on windows )

If you want to know what files your package package will install.... Open synaptic, click on package that you installed > Properties>Installed Files (I am farway from my Linux machine). If you can not find Properties ... play with Settings of Synaptic to make it visible.

something like here:

Code: [Select]
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/SynapticHowto



Offline poohduck

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Re: advanced bash scripting guide
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2017, 01:20:50 pm »
I found the location via synaptic package installer, properties etc. One of the options you have pointed out  :)